Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Those chords that "float over the top" of the music

I mentioned these chords or intervals in yesterdays post and it got brought up again in the comments, so here's a post devoted to them! I don't really like that worship is a genre of music but I'm going to pass over that discussion today because for better or for worse, these chords are really iconic in worship music. Sometimes if feels like cheating or copping out because they're so over done, but they really do make a nice atmospheric sound. I 100% expect to hear these chords with a nice dotted eighth note delay at the gates of heaven.

I have a feeling everyone has their own style and variation on these, so I'll list mine and I'd love to get other people's interpretations in the comments section. All my examples are in the key of G and will pretty much work over any chord progression in G. I'm not putting any rhythms down, just the changes. Generally I would play each chord for one measure or whatever works with the chord changes of the song.

#1)
e--10-10-10-10-
b--7--8--10-8--
g--7--7--7--7--

#2)
e--7--8--10-8--
b--8--8--8--8--
g--7--7--7--7--


#3)
e--15--15--15--15--
b--12--13--15--13--
g--12--12--12--12--


#4)
e--15--14--12--14--
b--15--15--15--15--



There you have it! The basic shapes of ambient worship guitar. The Mary had a Little Lamb of worship music. What shapes do you use?

1 comment:

rhoy pamparo said...

i sometimes throw in a G9 (or G2) arpeggio here and there as well

e--------5--
b------8----
g----7------
d--5--------

the patterns you do are pretty much a staple for tomlin's guitarist. still a great post to point it out!